• Food & Drink

    kantin dükkan bebek

    There’s not much I miss about living in the Nişantanşı area, except perhaps when it comes to the lunchtime value of an eatery like Kantin. What always impressed me about this lunchtime spot was the quality of its ingredients and its clean, flawless service. That same level of professionalism has now been brought to its take-out store opposite Bebek Park. The same thoughtful presentation, incredibly clean kitchen environment — and most importantly — delicious food are all available. As for seating … the park awaits, and if the weather ever decides to cooperate, there are few better places than the seaside Bebek Park to take an impromptu picnic. Don’t forget to sample the homemade ginger ale — it’s been added to my list of elixirs.

  • Food & Drink,  People

    beyoglu anonymous

    The most talented people in any profession don’t need to advertise. In fact, advertising or drawing undue attention often does more harm than good. If you not only know your trade, but have mastered it, your reputation will be more than enough. Last night I checked out a bar in Beyoglu that doesn’t even have a name. It doesn’t need one. Most people will probably end up calling it Alex’s Bar, as its proprietor, and his personality, are the driving force behind the experience. Not only is Alex a man who knows his drinks, he’s a man unafraid to refuse an order if he feels he can’t prepare it to his professional satisfaction. He’s not about to make a mojito out of season, especially if he doesn’t have the proper mint to create it. He will also mix single malt whisky as he puts it to, “Simultaneously defy ridiculous convention…

  • Places

    serdar-ı ekrem sokak

    When I first moved to Istanbul I rented a flat in the Galata neighbourhood which was scruffy but interesting area on the city map. Later, like a lot of Beyoglu, it became a bit disillusioning. As we all know, economic progress doesn’t necessarily benefit a neighbourhood’s character or hospitality. Especially when the new businesses and residents decide to do a sad or cynical interpretation of someone else’s culture for the benefit of non-residents. So it became easy to give the Galata neighbourhood a miss without missing anything at all. However Serdar-ı Ekrem Sokak seems to have undergone a mostly positive transformation, comfortably mixing old and new and featuring design businesses and small boutiques which draw on the local culture and architecture as much for the benefit of Turks — at least so it seems from the people sitting in the street-side cafés and coffee joints — as for outsiders. Change is…

  • Places

    modern lines, ottoman opulence: the grand tarabya

    Today I had the chance to preview a hotel that I’ve been anticipating with a mixture of excitement and as well as apprehension. The Grand Tarabya is almost legend among a certain generation of Turks who once regularly visited it for afternoon tea. Although I have no history with the hotel, I am fascinated by it as its architecture and dimension are unique to a shoreline Bosphorus hotel. I am also now a resident of Tarabya, so its operation is of some importance to my neighbourhood’s wellbeing. Right now the marina and the shoreline are undergoing a huge transformation in which the Grand Tarabya is the focal point. This building’s curving, modern lines and height are something you’d be more likely to see along the Corniche in Beirut than on the shores of the Bosporus, where buildings generally don’t exceed a four-storey height limit. And at 12 floors, it makes…

  • Places

    Lines in the silence

    Quiet as a church. Swallowing footsteps like  thick murk. I know you’re holding back, hidden behind closed doors.  I’m also waiting, waiting for the shadow to cross the gleam beneath your door. You’re not moving. You’ve drawn a line in the silence. But inside there’s a big shout welling up. And I know you’re desperate to release it. No need to procrastinate, Istanbul. I’m ready. Tell me.

  • Books & Lit

    that london book fair

    Today I just wanted to take some time to give a shout out to friend and frequent collaborator, Simon Johnson, who has taken his small, bicycle-delivered cult publication THAT from the streets of Istanbul to Art Dubai and now to the London Book Fair. A special LBF issue is about to hit the presses showcasing just a small portion of this city’s tremendous local talent and will be distributed throughout the fair, which runs from April 15-17 at Earl’s Court. The LBF is one of the world’s most important meetings of agents, publishers and authors, where deals are brokered and fresh talent comes to light. It’s also further indication that print, especially independent print, is still a very meaningful medium of expression. Whether you’re a writer, photographer, illustrator, or artist THAT continues to go places and take its contributors with it. Should you be interested in getting some good press for…

  • Food & Drink,  Places

    şişhane sweetspot: the kamondo mansion

    If I were to plan an indulgent escape for adults, without leaving the city limits, I would stay in the slightly spooky, somewhat spare restoration of the Kamondo family’s 19th Century mansion. Home to the Adahan Hotel, Comedus, Baylo and Gram, there’s something particularly louche about this street corner, especially in the evening hours. 18:00 – 18:15 … check into the Adahan Hotel. 18:15 – 19:45  … for your discretion. adult only content. 19:45 – 20:05 … compose yourself, make yourself respectable — at least briefly. 20:15 – 20:30 … go down to Comedus and stock up your room with some essentials (for later). 20:35 – 21:00 … take in the view at the Adahan restaurant upstairs with an aperitif 21:00 – 23:00 … enjoy some more Mediterranean delights. restrict yourself to those on the menu, for a while, anyway. 23:00 – 02:00 … indulge at Baylo, a New Yorkistan…

  • Places

    dear istanbul/mistanbul

    An eerie feeling swept in the last couple of days. On the weekend the sun soaked the city and it felt that the vibrant colours were seeping back up through the cracks. Then, as if to challenge my optimism, a clinging mist hugs the seaside, giving the shore an emptiness over the last two days. It’s almost as if you’ve gone all modest and now want to veil your favours. There’s no doubt you’re one capricious mistress, Istanbul — splashy bright one day hanging out your windows like a painted harlot in a loose-fitting dress, then the next, shuttered up dark and snooty and joyless as the wife of a protestant priest. Boats bob on a chill grey sea that bleeds into an equally colourless sky. The gulls overhead seem reluctant to laugh. You want to be all mysterious, all moody? Go ahead, torment me. I know your tricks.