• street colour, street art

    February 24th, 2013

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  • Tarlabaşı

    September 30th, 2012

    Between thriving Beyoglu and the Golden Horn, Tarlabaşı could be the most cheerfully doomed neighborhood in the world. I’ve been meaning to pay this area a visit for some time, but have been deterred by the fact that some other people whose work I really respect have already delved into this dilapidated old Greek hood which is largely populated by Kurdish migrants from Eastern Turkey as well as Roma. Regardless, I felt I needed to see this area before the last vestiges of its current community are driven out in the ongoing gentrification or “urban revitalization” or “historic protection” — whatever you’d like to call it — process is complete. What I found truly surprised me. It’s  the friendliest neighborhood I’ve encountered in Istanbul, and perhaps the poorest.

    There are plenty of men on street corners who don’t want their photographs taken for reasons you can probably imagine, yet there was no hostility to such an obvious foreigner poking about. In fact, most people were positively playful, and the spirit wasn’t limited to the children. Women in headscarves are normally camera shy, but down here, I was able to engage more than a few in conversation who at first didn’t want their picture taken, said no, and then laughed and said words to the effect of “Oh, all right.”

    You can see why the municipality of Beyoğlu wants to “regenerate” the neighborhood even if you don’t agree with the manner in which they’re doing it. This is not only a prime area given its location, but an area rich in the sort of architecture you can convert into guesthouses for tourists or funky little cafes as well as other profit-generating enterprises. It’s also a mess. There are hurdacı (scrap collectors) carts everywhere. And then there are the men hovering on street corners who don’t want their photos taken.

    For me the question is what’s going to happen to the families living here. It’s easy when you live in a nice house to judge the conditions down here as squalid and unacceptable, but I’ve never seen such enthusiastic and happy children playing in the streets. That doesn’t mean the environment is good but I couldn’t help but feel conflicted about what will happen when the last families are moved out. When I crossed the boulevard which gives this neighborhood its name and sought out  the more trodden bits of Beyoğlu I felt restless and didn’t want to stay. Somehow something didn’t feel real anymore. Nobody was smiling in quite the same way.

  • Balat textures

    July 4th, 2012

    Balat is one of my favorite places to get inspired. It may be run down but the light shines differently here. There are textures, colors, scents and a mood you won’t find anywhere else in Istanbul. Last time I visited my fingers were freezing on the shutter release. Yesterday was a different story. A whole new experience, in sun-drenched, tumble-down Balat.

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  • The organic market & gözleme

    June 16th, 2012

    This morning we returned to the Saturday Şişli Organik Pazarı in Bomonti for the first time in a while, and I was pleased to see that it was bustling with life. Turkey is fortunate to have such a great climate for produce, and the colors of the fruit and vegetables here were like something from a Cézanne painting. Perhaps it’s been a long while since I was last here, but it seems to me that there are more producers than before. The atmosphere was great, lots of people, families, and friends we hadn’t seen in a while. There’s wasn’t only food, either, there was everything from cosmetics, to children’s toys and textiles, all 100% certified organic. There was even some homegrown talent providing live music, though I’m not sure whether or not you can certify that organic or not.

    But let’s be honest, we were there for the food, which I’m a little obsessed with lately. Delicious, fresh, crisp Turkish produce. Growing up in a cold climate, it used to be hard to appreciate fruits and vegetables. By the time they were transported to you, the taste, and probably a considerable amount of nutrition had vanished. Read More…

  • The Alchemy of Pink

    April 30th, 2012

    Pink, there are times when you come off a little garish, or seem the feebler cousin of Red, lacking that vibrant color’s conviction. For some you can be a little hard to define, your hue being somewhere between Red and Magenta. But when you place yourself in partnership with Green, you truly know how to shine, perhaps even how to heal. You also know how to highlight magnificently the hours of dawn and dusk in between the contrast of slanting beams of light and long layers of shadow. You’re the color of love and the signal fire that says the equinox is here.

    Pink, you definitely have your moments. The spectrum of the universe would not be the same without you. Keep shining.

  • Cobalt into red gold: the alchemy of autumn color.

    December 9th, 2011

    Start with the three distinct primary colors (red, yellow, blue — right?) fade the seasonal light, wither a few leaves and see what begins to happen…

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