Kuzguncuk Mahallesi

  • March 21st, 2012

    THIS NEIGHBORHOOD BELONGS TO ANOTHER ERA OF ISTANBUL.

    Don’t know about you, but there are times I want to live an urban life without all the latté and fast food chains, which seem to be claiming more and more prime real estate and more and more of our everyday lives. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not above using them, it’s just they get a little tiring, manufacturing the same experience over and over.

    That’s why I felt so refreshed the other day when I heeded historian Selin Barlas‘ advice and headed to Kuzguncuk. There wasn’t one branded paper coffee cup rolling around the streets, or simit chain store in sight. Instead there was relaxed local scene, where people clearly knew one another and weren’t in any hurry to be somewhere else. Kuzguncuk is a self-contained, functioning neighborhood with its own post office, a butcher’s, several bakeries and a host of independent little cafes and boutiques interspersed throughout its high street and side-streets. There’s a mix of new and old, but none of it feels artificial or imposed.

    There’s also a terrific little square looking out onto the Bosporus, bounded by a row of yalis on one side and Çinaralti Cafe and Ismet Baba fish restaurant on the other. Locals and interlopers like me are welcome sit on benches, refreshing themselves with tea, Turkish coffee or fresh squeezed orange juice as behemoth freighters fill the glistening blue corridor mute as ghosts.

    Perhaps that’s what makes the place. It seems to me that the locals are all actively engaged in and enjoy their own neighborhood. It’s the difference between a neighborhood and community, or a house and a home. There’s a feeling of belonging here. That’s something you just can’t synthesize, or buy at a Starbucks.

    To say I was charmed would be an understatement. There was something here I haven’t experienced in a long time, and call me sentimental, but I don’t want it to change.

    ÇINARALTI CAFE.

    ROMANI FLOWER BUCKETS ACCENTUATING THE LOCAL COLOR.

    SIDE-STREET CAFES.

    INTERESTING SHOP WINDOWS.

    HISTORICAL ARCHITECTURE.

    ISMET BABA FISH RESTAURANT.

    LOCAL BAKERIES.

    What makes a neighborhood more than just a place to live? How do you experience a sense of belonging, or community? Can we go back to a time when a neighborhood was more than just a stopover to take a breath as we run from one place to next? Should we? Is that neighborhood feeling irretrievable? Maybe we should be rootless or risk getting stuck? What do you think? Is a sense of place important?

    Talk to me … I’m listening.

2 Comments

  • Neslihan 03.21.2012  

    This how I feel about our neighborhood, Yenikoy, I belong here. And I love it. Though Kuzguncuk has a very special and a little reserved feeling to it when we talk about belonging, it’s still one of the best kept gems in this big city. Thanks to you, I realized that it’s been a while we’ve been to Kuzguncuk and İsmet Baba.

  • Saliha  

    I thing that an old (at least three generation) neighborhood does make a place more then just a place to live. That makes an area alive and breathable. And having steady streets, Kuzguncuk, Beylerbeyi, Çengelköy are peaceful and very welcoming neighborhoods to live. That is why i prefer living in that quite but lively part of the city. I grow up in Anatolian side and always believe that Anatolian part of Istanbul for living, European side is for work. I have lived in Beylerbeyi for a very short time . Since then, despite of living in Uskudar, i am dreaming of a house over there, never lost my connections with my neighbors. This is how this part of city binds you to itself.

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